My Blog

Posts for: November, 2019

By Phillip J Wolf DDS
November 23, 2019
Category: Oral Health
PopStarDemiLovatoPopsOutJayGlazersTooth

Singer and actor Demi Lovato has a new claim to fame: formidable martial artist. When she is not in the recording studio, on stage or in front of the camera, Lovato can often be found keeping in shape at Jay Glazer's Hollywood (California) gym. Glazer, who is best known as a sports journalist, also runs conditioning programs for professional athletes and celebrities based on mixed martial arts. On March 6, Glazer got more than he bargained for when 5'3" Lovato stepped into the ring and knocked out his front tooth.

Glazer reportedly used super glue to put his tooth back together. Not a good idea! While it may not be convenient to drop everything and get to the dental office, it takes an expert to safely treat a damaged tooth. If you glue a broken tooth, you risk having to undergo major work to correct your temporary fix—it's no easy task to "unglue" a tooth, and the chemicals in the glue may damage living tooth tissue as well as the surrounding gum and bone.

Would you know what to do in a dental emergency? Here are some guidelines:

  • If you chip a tooth, save the missing piece if possible. We may be able to reattach it.
  • If your tooth is cracked, rinse your mouth with warm water, but don't wiggle the tooth around or bite down on it. If it's bleeding, hold clean gauze to the area and call our office.
  • If your tooth is knocked loose or is pushed deeper into the socket, don't force the tooth back into position on your own. Immediate attention is very important.
  • If your tooth is knocked out, there's a chance it can be reattached. Pick up the tooth while being careful not to touch the root. Then rinse it off and have either someone place into its socket, or place it against the inside of your cheek or in a glass of milk. Please call the office immediately or go to a hospital.

What's the best thing to do in an emergency? Call us right away, and DON'T super glue your tooth! You can prevent worse problems by letting a professional handle any dental issues.¬†And if you've been living with a chipped, broken or missing tooth, call us to schedule an appointment for a consultation—there are several perfectly safe ways to restore your smile. Meanwhile, if you practice martial arts to keep in shape, think twice before getting into the ring with Demi Lovato!

To learn more, read the Dear Doctor articles “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “Saving New Permanent Teeth After Injury.”


By Phillip J Wolf DDS
November 13, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
4FoodsThatAreGoodforBothYourMouthandYourBody

You can't separate your oral health from your overall health. What's beneficial for your body in general is usually beneficial for your teeth and gums.

Take the foods you eat: good nutrition is essential to general health and well-being. But the same foods that keep the rest of your body healthy often do the same for your mouth—and those that are not so good for the rest of you are usually not good for your teeth and gums either.

Here are 4 different types of foods that positively impact both mouth and body.

Cheese and dairy. Dairy products are rich in calcium, essential for strengthening both your bones and your teeth. Cheese helps stimulate saliva and protects against calcium loss. Cow's milk contains minerals and proteins both your body and mouth needs. It also contains lactose, a less acidic sugar that doesn't contribute to tooth decay.

Plant foods. Vegetables and fruit are loaded with vitamins and nutrients that keep the body functioning normally. They also contain fiber: Not only is this good for your digestive system, it requires chewing to break it down in the mouth, which stimulates saliva. A good flow of saliva helps prevent your mouth from becoming too acidic and thus more prone to dental disease.

Black and green teas. A nice cup of hot tea isn't just soothing—it's rich in antioxidants that help fight disease in the body (and the mouth). Black tea also contains fluoride, which has been proven to strengthen enamel against acid attack.

Chocolate. There's both good and bad news about this perennial favorite. The good news is the polyphenolic compounds (a kind of antioxidant) in unrefined cocoa can protect against disease including tooth decay. The bad news is most processed chocolate is loaded with added sugar—not the healthiest substance for your body, and definitely not for your teeth. Try then to incorporate small amounts of chocolate in your diet, the lower the sugar content the better.

Eating nutritiously helps your body stay healthy and disease-free. And coupled with daily hygiene and regular dental visits, it's one of the best things you can do for your teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on nutrition and dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition and Oral Health: How Diet Impacts Dental and General Health.”


By Phillip J Wolf DDS
November 03, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   vaping  
VapingCouldBeJustasHarmfultoYourTeethandGumsasSmoking

The electronic cigarette (e-cig), the much-acclaimed smoking alternative, has recently been linked to hundreds of lung-related illnesses and deaths among otherwise healthy young adults. But dentists were actually among the first to sound alarm bells on the potential harm of “vaping,” particularly to dental health.

If you're vaping as a substitute for smoking, you may be trading one set of oral health risks for another. Many dentists believe vaping may be no safer for your mouth than traditional tobacco.

An e-cig is a small, handheld device that holds a mixture of water, flavoring and chemicals. The device heats the liquid until it becomes a gaseous aerosol the user inhales into their lungs. Proponents say it's a safer and cleaner alternative to smoking. But, like cigarettes, vaping mixtures can contain nicotine. This chemical constricts blood vessels, decreasing nutrients and infection-fighting agents to the gums and increasing the risk of gum disease.

And although vaping flavorings are FDA-approved as a food additive, there's some evidence as an aerosol they irritate the mouth's inner membranes and cause mouth dryness similar to smoking. Vaping liquids also contain propylene glycol for moisture preservation, which some studies have shown increases a buildup of plaque, the bacterial film most responsible for dental disease.

All of these different effects from vaping can create a perfect storm in the mouth for disease. So, rather than switch to vaping, consider quitting the tobacco habit altogether. It's a solid thing to do for your teeth and gums, not to mention the rest of the body.

As we commemorate the Great American Smokeout on November 21, this month is the perfect time to take action. Here are some tips to help you kick the habit.

Don't try to quit all at once. Your body has developed a physical connection with nicotine, so quitting “cold turkey” can be extremely difficult and unpleasant. Although different approaches work for different people, you may find it easier to overcome your habit by gradually reducing the number of cigarettes you smoke each day.

Enroll in a cessation program. There are a number of step-by-step programs, some involving medication, that can help you quit smoking. Talk to us or your doctor about using a cessation program to end your tobacco habit.

Seek support from others. Beating the smoking habit can be tough if you're trying to do it solo. Instead, enlist the help of family and friends to support you and keep you on track. Consider also joining a supervised support group for quitting smoking near you or online.

Smoking can harm your dental health and vaping may be just as harmful. Distancing yourself from both habits will help you maintain a healthier smile and a healthier life.

If you would like more information about the effects of vaping and tobacco use, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Vaping and Oral Health” and “Smoking and Gum Disease.”